ESPN: Stealing or Borrowing?

You make the call.

The Associated Press’ article on the signing of former Arizona State QB Andrew Walter by the New England Patriots:

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The New England Patriots have signed quarterback Andrew Walter and released quarterback Matt Gutierrez.

The 6-foot-6, 230-pound Walter has spent the last four seasons with Oakland after being selected by the Raiders in the third round of the 2005 draft out of Arizona State. He has played in 15 games, starting nine, and completed 174 of 333 passes for 1,919 yards and three touchdowns.

He was waived by the Raiders on Thursday.

Gutierrez joined the Patriots as a rookie free agent out of Idaho State in 2007. He played in five games as a rookie, completing one pass for 15 yards. He began last season on the practice squad before being signed to the 53-man roster on Sept. 13 following a season-ending knee injury to Tom Brady.

And now, the ESPN story:

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The New England Patriots have signed quarterback Andrew Walter and released quarterback Matt Gutierrez.The 6-foot-6, 230-pound Walter has spent the last four seasons with Oakland after being selected by the Raiders in the third round of the 2005 draft out of Arizona State. He has played in 15 games, starting nine, and completed 174 of 333 passes for 1,919 yards and three touchdowns.

He was waived by the Raiders on Thursday.

Gutierrez joined the Patriots as a rookie free agent out of Idaho State in 2007. He played in five games as a rookie, completing one pass for 15 yards. He began last season on the practice squad before being signed to the 53-man roster on Sept. 13 following a season-ending knee injury to Tom Brady.

The Patriots had brought in quarterback Cleo Lemon for a workout on Saturday and were reported to be considering signing him. Lemon is a 29-year-old veteran who has played for the Baltimore Ravens, San Diego Chargers, Miami Dolphins and Jacksonville Jaguars.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

I suppose if by “this report,” ESPN is referring to a piece on Cleo Lemon, then this qualifies as borrowing.  Otherwise, I’ve got to say it looks like stealing.  I wonder if the little paragraph at the end changes the amount that ESPN has to pay for content?

Maybe this article should have said, “Information from undergraduate interns was used in this report.”  Give credit where credit is due.

3 comments

  1. This seems to validate your theory about the lack of importance owners place on team performace.

    Not only do they still have scouts, but the Grizz are reportedly making a nice chunk of change from their woeful operation: “For that [team owner Michael Heisley] is unapologetic, especially given several other owners have privately sought his advice. ‘We’re definitely in the top third of the teams in the league (in terms of the bottom line),’ Heisley said. ‘It’s because we’ve watched our expenses and we have the support of a good, hard-core group of people. We’re going to survive no matter what. But we cannot compete salary-wise with places like Los Angeles and Cleveland. Some of my worst financial losses came during those (playoff) years. You can’t sustain that.’”

    From an article on Hoops Hype

  2. They have to all pay attention to the bottom line. The economics of sustained excellence tend to favor big markets and owners with very deep pockets. You have to have a solid population base; you can’t have too many competitors for the sports entertainment dollar; you have to have solid leadership and you need talent.

    For the Lakers to have missed the playoffs all of 5 times in 61 years should say something loud and clear about the economics of the business. And it follows, for me at least, that there is no point in rooting for the Knicks or Clippers until they demonstrate an AUTHENTIC desire to win. Neither have done so for years.

    At any given time, there are only a small number of teams in any league who are authentically competing to win a championship. There is an even smaller number who are actually able to do it. And, more often than not, it’s the usual suspects.

  3. T3,

    This is standard operating procedure for ESPN. There are thoudands of articles that do this every year. Take AP story, Add two sentences, write ESPN.com services, and then an AP disclaimer at the end.

    What I had discovered a couple of months ago is how ESPN influences the already terrible AP. It goes like this:

    1) AP story on black athlete.
    2) ESPN story adds more negative information to story and lists under ESPN.com
    3) AP reissues updated story with ESPN info and possibly more.
    4) ESPN then reissues or just UPDATES story purely as an AP report.

    The reader is not aware of ESPN’s involvement at all.

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